December 14, 2013

Welcome Harry Potter Fans!


photo coypright Karin Corbin 2013

photo copyright 2013 Karin Corbin

photo copyright Karin Corbin 2013
Just playing with the prototypes for the new "Old Town" section of the Tiny Village series. It will be a little while yet before I get all the tall buildings designed, cut, photographed and the instructions written. But at least I am on the path to get there. The folks at my local coffee shop are long used to see me bringing in buildings to assemble. But they have never seen them used like this before now.

I made no attempt to get everything perfect, this is just conceptual play time. A reward to myself as well as good motivation to keep on going with the process of hatching new buildings. But the ancient medieval sections of European cities are far from perfect so perhaps a bit of chaos, gaps, leaning this way and that is actually very appropriate.

If anyone has ever wondered about the scale of the Tiny Village set it is basically done at Z scale in model railroad, 1:220. But truthfully it is a very loose Z scale as I am not trying to recreate scale models buildings from measured drawings.  However it will make a charming snowy train scene, especially if you can find (and afford) a brass Z scale train set. Or of course you could paint a plastic set white, silver or gold.  The Z scale people and other accessories will work with the Tiny Village. There are unpainted sets of people available in Z scale, that kind of item is probably not going to be in a local train store but you can get them on the internet.

Holiday displays

photo copyright Karin Corbin 2013

Holiday display pieces can be very classy without costing a lot of money. The photo above is a 3" wide crystal salt cellar with a few of the Micro Tiny Village buildings set on top of cotton batting. Very simple to do as well as classy looking. The salt cellar cost me $1.00 at the local thrift store.
photo copyright Karin Corbin 2013

I now have a whole table full of lead crystal glasses, candlesticks and vases purchased for under $25.00 from my local thrift stores. Those colored 50% off stickers and senior discount helped out.  Turn a wine glass upside down and you get an enclosed dome at the bottom as well as a display stand on top. An upside down narrow champagne flute can hold a decorated bottle brush tree in the "dome" with a glitter house village up top. Some of you will already have a china cabinet full of lovely pieces that can be used to make a temporary display. But don't drink too much "holiday" while you work or you will get nothing done and all the glasses will need washing.
photo copyright Karin Corbin 2013

Of course I have no idea what will happen to the crystal Christmas display when I am finally finished with it as I don't have a fireplace mantel and my dining table rolls from side to side when it is stormy.  My workshop space is not a good place for fragile crystal either. There is no china cabinet in my life; crystal and motorhomes do not mix well. But it is important in terms of marketing to show these kind of display ideas using my designs, so it is still a good investment of my time and money. I know, one of you can invite me to a New Years dinner party and I can bring the centerpiece! I have a lot of work to do if I am going to get this display pulled together by January 1st. But I know you enjoy those behind the scene shots so here you go...

Another new hatchling

© Karin Corbin 2013, all reproduction right reserved

Hatchling number three is designed. it is 1-5/8" tall. Numbers one and two are almost production ready. See the prototypes in the image below. Today I will cut what is hopefully the last prototype version of these three designs. I am very picky about the proportions and the ease of folding and assembly so it generally takes three or more prototype revisions to fine tune the details. No major changes, just fussing with how deep is an overhang, how wide is a window, how large are the perforations, etc.


© Karin Corbin 2013, all reproduction right reserved

When I get tired with the fussing on the final fit I start slicing back roof overhangs on buildings to see how they look with the walls touching each other. I won't know the final arrangement until I get the whole grouping done but I can't resit the reward of playtime.

I have been having way too much fun at the local thrift shop buying cut glass pieces. Most of them are real crystal. For $30.00 I have a whole table full of pieces to use as display stands and cloches. I do need to make some larger scale buildings for that project. No shortage of ideas for new pieces in my head, I have clip files full of images of old buildings plus Seattle has lots of fun 1920's and 1930's Tudor style cottages and bungalows as well as some good looking
Victorians.